Equipping Emerging Game Makers with Tools for Success, with Evva Kraikul, GLITCH

GLITCH promotes the exploration of digital games as a culture, career and creative practice.

Evva Kraikul, GLITCH

Evva Kraikul, GLITCH

If I were to tell a joke about Evva Kraikul, it might go something like this “A game designer, a neuroscientist and an entrepreneur walk into a bar. She ordered herself a drink.” Evva brings her experience in game design and neuroscience to the startup world where she is the cofounder of GLITCH.

Evva was an extraordinarily early adopter of technology. At the age of four, she was interested in all things digital. She used a laptop to explore online. When she was ten-years-old, she set up a website and sold Beanie Babies. Her first online transaction was for $1,000. She built battle simulators in AOL chat rooms. She is a true digital native.

Evva’s parents encouraged her to be either a doctor or lawyer. “Those seemed to be my only two options,” she remembers. She pursued her degree in neuroscience at the University of Minnesota, but her interests in all things digital would not let her go. She looked for local resources for emerging game makers but found none.

Evva and fellow student Nic VanMeerten set up programs and events. They invited gaming industry insiders to give lectures and workshops. Fellow students were enthusiastic, paying to attend these events. With this proof of concept under their belts, Evva and Nic were awarded a $45,000 grant to continue their work. This work eventually led to the startup, GLITCH.

GLITCH supports emerging game makers through a series of ongoing programs, events, and residencies. GLITCH recently began providing small grants to game makers who are doing interesting work.

By supporting emerging game makers, GLITCH is bringing a unique perspective to the gaming industry.

Social Entrepreneurship Quotes from Evva Kraikul

“My parents didn’t believe me when the first sale was $1,000.”

[spp-tweet tweet=”“There was something missing.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

“There weren’t a lot of resources and support for emerging game makers.”

[spp-tweet tweet=”“We tested them. We did small programs.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

[spp-tweet tweet=”“That’s the most powerful thing – going in open minded.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

“My initial ideas change drastically. They aren’t the same as when they started.”

“How do we allow people to be vulnerable and talk about the issues they’re facing, in games?”

“All you can do is put your design in the world, let people use it, and iterate.”

[spp-tweet tweet=”“Everything you put into the world should be a living thing.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

“The thing that was the hardest and continues to be most difficult is learning how to lead.”

[spp-tweet tweet=”“I’ve been learning how to say yes, and more specifically how to say no.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

“I want to support emerging game makers who are doing interesting and innovative work.”

[spp-tweet tweet=”“I love games. I don’t love where games are right now.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

[spp-tweet tweet=”“Be bold. Be daring.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

[spp-tweet tweet=”“Find a community that you’re specifically passionate about.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

[spp-tweet tweet=”“Find a problem you’re itching to solve. Jump in and shut it down.” @Evvahs, @GlitchMN”]

Social Entrepreneurship Resources:

About the Author
Tony Loyd is a TEDx speaker, podcast host and the author of Crazy Good Advice: 10 Lessons Learned from 150 Leading Social Entrepreneurs. He is a former Fortune 500 executive with extensive experience in strategic planning, talent management, and leadership development. Tony is the host of the podcast Social Entrepreneur where you can hear the stories of changemakers who are making an impact on the world.

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